Thursday, September 18, 2014

Working Hard and Sore Muscles

We've been kickin' it hard these last two weeks, and it's been feeling great to work and play hard in the studio. I'm super excited about what we'll be showing inside the Mi Casa Your Casa exhibit at the High Museum of Art next week Friday. It's been feeling so satisfying to do this work that now I'm feeling it, and by "it" I mean sore!

I was trying to figure out what I'd blog about and decided to share some of my favorite ways to help these sore muscles be ready to rock the next day. So here we go...

1. I like to have fish or eggs in my dinner to help with damaged muscle fibers.

2. I go for a nice easy walk/jog for 10-15 minutes to get fresh blood pumping. I believe it helps decrease lactic acid and increase fresh nutrients to sore muscles.

3. I stretch and roll on a foam roller... Or get a massage, but a foam roller is the cheaper massage therapist, haha.

4. Epsome salts bath!!! 

4. I add some Ionic-Fizz Magnesium Plus to my water to help muscle cramps and encourage a nice restful sleep.

5. Tai chi - I've been telling myself I'd do more tai chi prior to and after long rehearsal days because it truly has helped me reduce sore fatigued muscles. I haven't been doing it as of late, but now that it's in the blog... I better do it! =) 
I learned a tai chi practice that was always done for an hour after kung fu and it helped me feel so much less sore after intense practices. There is some interesting thought on this practice, and in case anyone is curious, an intro article from a place where I have trained can be found here http://www.shaolin-world.net/classes/taichi.

So that's some of the things I like to do when I have overworked muscles.

Peace,

Rose

P.S. - I Captured a few pictures of Anna showing some of her traveling phrase we'll be doing while weaving in and out of the geometric sculpture.


Sunday, September 07, 2014

And we're back

It feels as if we have started the new season in a place of solid understanding and communication. We are hard at work on the first of two pieces that we will perform in the piazza of the High Museum of Art, a piece centered around the phrase (and the title of the work) "A home is a home is a home". The piece will take place in the new public installation by Hector Esrawe and Ignacio Cadena here in Atlanta and then again in Arkansas in an installation by artist Peter Daugherty.

We began our process with a stream of consciousness writing on the prompt "A home is a home is a home", picking words that stuck out to us and then developing movement phrases from one of these words. From the start I have been intrigued by the repeated movement ideas that have shown themselves through all of our individual work, revealing commonalities in our understandings of what home is. We rest our heads, we emerge from a small shape to a larger one, we feel chaotic, we put things in order. We have used similar processes in the past to devise work but while the process is the same it seems we have changed. We know each other more intimately than we did this time last year and it shows in the work. We can push ourselves in new directions, helping each other grow as artists. We can communicate in a free and easy way. We can help fulfill one another's ideas. 

I am beginning to see our processes as a series of riddles All of us trying to figure them out. All of us striving to reveal something beautiful. I am so lucky to get to work in this supportive group of artists and I am excited to see where this season takes us.


Wednesday, August 27, 2014

YAY! Our new season has started!

I'm super excited about this upcoming season with CORE. It looks like we have a lot of wonderful projects ahead of us, and I am so ready to get back into the studio and create! I'm also looking forward to being amongst my fellow dancers as it's always invigorating having so many creative energies in one room. I can honestly say I've missed their individual personalities and fun spirits. Here's to jumping in to our 2014/2015 season on such a gorgeous day!

Rose

Monday, August 25, 2014

CORE hits the road with new programs in West Palm Beach


This past weekend CORE Artistic Director, Sue Schroeder along with Company Manager Patton White traveled to West Palm Beach, FL for two exciting projects bringing CORE into new communities.


Sue and Kate Klein, the Director of West Palm Beach Atlantic University's dance program, have developed a project that engages the dance students of WPBAU in the process of discovering the extent to which dance can serve as a channel of communication. With the support of a Touring and Residency grant from Alternate ROOTS, Sue and Patton spent some time in residence at WPBAU to create an original dance with and for the Palm Beach Atlantic University Dance Ensemble.

While there, CORE also presented movement workshops to the Palm Beach Habilitation Center in nearby Lake Worth, an agency dedicated to helping adults with disabilities become more independent through skills training and employment placement, as well to the residents of the Lourdes Noreen McKeen assisted living facility.




Reflecting on the time spent in West Palm Beach, Sue says, "Our work was tremendous. The students were open and receptive to us and all the new information that we shared with them. Our experience in the community at the Habilitation Center of Lake Worth and at Lourdes Noreen McKeen assisted living facility touched us deeply and broadened the meaning of our work.  We left West Palm Beach very filled and with great satisfaction. We created a new work with and for the Palm Beach Atlantic University Dance Ensemble, a home is a home is a home. The piece will premiere in early November at the Kravis Center."

Monday, July 28, 2014

Dynamic X-Change Teaching Artist Lydia Hance

CORE Collaborator Lydia Hance is a dancer, a choreographer, and a teaching artist. As part of CORE's Dynamic X-Change, she works with students at the Monarch School.

"My time at the Monarch School as a DX teacher is some of the most rewarding and fruitful time I've spent as a teacher, and that's because it was truly an exchange.  It was an exchange of joy, of risk, and of celebration.  Before I came to the DX program, I was mostly teaching technique to dancers.  While this is so important to our craft and our art, teaching in the DX was fulfilling in another way.  In a way that allows teachers to walk into the room and know they don't have to have all the answers,  in a way that allows for discovery and sharing in the classroom.  The students see that their teachers are still students.  And that is the most valuable of lessons."

 


 

Monday, July 21, 2014

Thoughts on Fieldwork from Houston Fieldwork Facilitator Neil Ellis Orts

Thoughts on Fieldwork from Houston Fieldwork Facilitator Neil Ellis Orts

True confession: I did not like Fieldwork at first. I won't tell the story here, but suffice to say, it was not my cuppa. Or so I thought.

But that experience was in another city. When I moved to Houston in 2003, I needed to meet people, artist people. I knew there was a Fieldwork session here, so I looked it up, gritted my teeth, and signed on. Then, Fieldwork became the foundation for my Houston artist community. By participating in Fieldwork, I found not only artists I admired, I found collaborators. Never mind the affordable cost for the weeks of feedback and a showcase at the end. It's the best deal in town.

And my original dislike? Here's the thing: the feedback format is difficult. It takes some work just learning how to give feedback. But giving feedback in this particular way also tuned my ear to how to receive feedback, as well. Giving myself over to the process, I hope, has made me a better colleague as well as a better artist.

Best way to get a bigger picture? Join us next session.

Breath & Bone/Orts Performance, Until Spring, at Box 13 Artspace, Lone Star Explosion 2014. Performers: Joanna Bowen Bridget Lois Jensen, and Neil Ellis Orts. Photo by Alex Barber

Friday, July 11, 2014

CORE's Leslie Scates named one of HOUSTON PRESS 100 Creatives

All photos by Catalina Molnari,
courtesy of HOUSTON PRESS
Choreographer, dance educator, and CORE collaborator Leslie Scates was recently named one of the Houston's 100 Creatives by Houston Press.

Leslie has created numerous commissions for CORE, including last season's herd, and recently became a Dynamic X-change teacher, working with students at The Monarch School.

"I feel honored to work with the company... No other company works quite the way CORE does. So fertile and humane. Across disciplines. Across borders."

Leslie's work at The Monarch School teaching movement classes began this past spring:
 
I said yes to the opportunity to work with a population on the autistic spectrum because I have a deep interest in therapeutic movement and also a keen interest in brains that think and operate differently than my own.  I love the work and the students are delightful and challenging. Some of the needs that I feel the movement classes meet for these movers are:
  • Stress reduction
    • Somatic awareness 
    • Kinesthetic awareness 
    • Sensory integration 
    • Collaborative skill acquisition 
    • Social skill acquisition 
    • Range of motion increases 
    • Motor skill refinement; gross and fine 
     
    I am looking forward to continuing my work with the Monarch school students. It is a laboratory for me as an educator and dancer to listen very closely to the emergent needs of a class of individuals, and to provide a conduit for creative expression, social interaction, collaboration and movement pathways.  These students are filled with language that inspires me to keep setting and reaching personal goals. And we have fun and sometimes we have intense moments. This is all valuable to me. I am glad to be a part of the students' weekly movement program at Monarch. I am also deeply grateful and my artistic process has been enhanced and shaped by being a part of CORE performance company.
     

    Read Leslie's 100 Creatives interview here,